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May 9, 2012

Purling Right Handed for Lefties

Since Monday, I showed you how to knit right handed for lefties, today I'll show you the purl done right handed for lefties.

Note: the yarn is in the right hand (English Method), and if you are following a pattern, no alterations needed, because you're knitting "right handed"
1) When you insert the right needle into the stitch, just insert the left needle down onto the right needle.

2) Hold the needles in your left hand, while you yarn over (counterclockwise) starting between the needles.

3) Move the left needle up and over (moving the needle in front of) the right needle.

4) Move the right needle up and away from the left needle, pulling the completed stitch off the left needle.  This is the only time I move the right needle, during the stitch.


And that is how you purl right handed for lefties!

May 7, 2012

Knitting Right Handed for Lefties

Okay, if you don't know already, I am left handed who crochets left handed, and learned how to crochet before I learned how to knit.  Crochet felt very natural for me so learning the mechanics of it took me about a half hour.

Knitting on the other hand!  Felt very awkward, and clunky, and blegh!  I tried learning from my sister first (who knits right handed one row, then, instead of turning to purl the next, she knits the next row left handed).  I just could not wrap my head around this because you have to constantly alter the patterns you're working on, adjusting them to the left handed rows.

So, I tried knitting left handed, but that felt so unnatural because I kept losing my yarn from the yarn overs, (with the yarn in my right hand) and I could not have the yarn in my left hand, because after 3-4 years of crocheting left handed (yarn in right hand), changing which hand held the yarn was not an option.

So, after 3 years of on and off attempts in trying to get knitting down, I discovered that I indeed could knit right handed via my left hand.  Confused?  All that means is, you knit the English method (yarn in the right hand) while keeping the right needle stationary, moving the left needle to create the stitch.

Here's some pictures to show what I mean:

1) When you insert the right needle in the stitch, just insert the left needle down onto the right needle.


2) Hold the needles in your left hand, while you yarn over (counterclockwise) 

3) Move the left needle up and over (moving the needle behind) the right needle

4) Move the right needle up and away from the left needle (this is the only time I move the right needle)

Congrats, you've completed a knit stitch :)

I hope this help you on your knitting endeavors, and spares the headaches of trying to learn, like I had.

Happy knitting!

May 4, 2012

Size isn't everything!

It's true...it's not just the size of the hook, but also the shape that effects your gauge.

To prove my point, I stitched up an experiment.  I have 3 different shaped H (5.00 mm) hooks:

from left to right:
1) thrift store "mystery hook"
2) Susan Bates brand
3) Boye brand

I crocheted three 20 sts/20 rows squares, 1 square for each hook.

each square got slightly wider, but had the same height.

smallest square on top (mystery hook)
to largest square on bottom (Boye hook)

So, I repeat: it's not just the size of the hook that effects you gauge, it's also the shape!

This is good to know if you can't quite get the right amount of stitches in your gauge swatch, but have the height right, try using a different brand of hook.  This is something I've run into before, but didn't think about it at the time.  So I thought I'd save you guys the trouble :).

May 2, 2012

Curling!

No, the title isn't about the sport (though I do enjoy a good curling match!) it's about how the edges of a crocheted piece can curl inwards.  This has been an inner battle I have had ever since I learned how to crochet--me vs. single crochet!

meet exhibit A

See what I have to deal with?  I have tried different things in order to solve this little dilemma without blocking the project.  I've tried:

  • turning the piece, then chaining
  • chaining, then turning the piece
  • making sure the chain is extra loose
  • taking the hook out of the loop, turn, then re-insert the hook from the opposite end
  • changing the direction I turn


And I've looked in books, and online to find a solution.

What did I find that worked?

Nothing.  Nada.  Zip.  Zero.  Zilch.

The search lasted 8 years until I just gave up.  Blocking is the only solution for this issue.  Either finger pressing (which doesn't completely get rid of it) or blocking (which changes the fabric quality).